Walking and Cycling

South Bank is uniquely Queensland; from its sub-tropical climate to its flourishing and vibrant landscape, the space celebrates outdoor living at its best. One of the best ways to see the precinct’s natural beauty is by taking a stroll or going cycling.

Bicycle

CityCycle

You don’t need to own a bike to enjoy cycling through South Bank – instead, you can rent one through CityCycle, Brisbane’s bike hire program. There are three CityCycle stations at South Bank, one at the Maritime Museum, one on Grey Street and one outside of QPAC. To use them, simply register at the CityCycle website, choose your subscription, collect the bike and return it to any CityCycle station across Brisbane when you’re done. 



Cycle Tracks

• Clem Jones Promenade. The Clem Jones Promenade is a scenic riverwalk that spans the length of the South Bank Parklands. Stretching from QPAC to the Maritime Museum, the Promenade is fringed by magnificent fig trees and has unobscured views of the Brisbane River and CBD. It is the perfect location for walking, running or cycling and it also has plenty of seating for those who just want to sit back and enjoy the view.

• The Goodwill Bridge. The winner of multiple architecture awards, the Goodwill Bridge positively oozes character and charm. This 450 metre long footbridge links South Bank to the city’s Botanic Gardens and is used by tens of thousands of pedestrians and cyclists each week. The Goodwill Bridge opened in 2001 and was named after The Goodwill Games, which here held in Brisbane that same year. It was designed by Cox Rayner Architects.

• The Victoria Bridge. The Victoria Bridge is the main bridge linking South Bank to the city. It’s located at the edge of the Parklands (just outside of QPAC) and is always bustling with pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. The bridge has a colourful history – it is currently in its fourth iteration after the first attempt, made of wood, started to collapse in 1965 and the second attempt, made of iron, was destroyed in Brisbane’s 1893 floods.  The third iteration was completed in 1897 but was later demolished to make way for a bigger bridge that could handle greater volumes of traffic. The current bridge opened in 1969 and is still in service today.


Walking Tracks

• Clem Jones Promenade. The Clem Jones Promenade is a scenic riverwalk that spans the length of the South Bank Parklands. Stretching from QPAC to the Maritime Museum, the Promenade is fringed by magnificent fig trees and has unobscured views of the Brisbane River and CBD. It is the perfect location for walking, running or cycling and it also has plenty of seating for those who just want to sit back and enjoy the view.

• Rainforest Walk. It’s not often that you find a rainforest in the middle of a city, so a stroll along this hidden gem is a must when you’re at South Bank. The rainforest walk is located in the heart of the Parklands and features stunning boardwalk surrounded by lush, local trees and plants. It’s the perfect place some tranquil reflection or a bit of wildlife spotting – the space is home to plenty of colourful lizards, birds and fish.

• The Arbour. Those with a penchant for colour and creativity will love the Arbour, a kilometre-long walkway awning located in the Parklands. The Arbour has won multiple awards for its architecture and is comprised of 443 curling, galvanised steel posts that are each clad with vibrant magenta bougainvillea flowers. It also has a ribbon of yellow steel running along it to provide shade and weather protection for its patrons.

• The Goodwill Bridge. The winner of multiple architecture awards, the Goodwill Bridge positively oozes character and charm. This 450 metre long footbridge links South Bank to the city’s Botanic Gardens and is used by tens of thousands of pedestrians and cyclists each week. The Goodwill Bridge opened in 2001 and was named after The Goodwill Games, which here held in Brisbane that same year. It was designed by Cox Rayner Architects.

• The Victoria Bridge. The Victoria Bridge is the main bridge linking South Bank to the city. It’s located at the edge of the Parklands (just outside of QPAC) and is always bustling with pedestrians, cyclists and vehicles. The bridge has a colourful history – it is currently in its fourth iteration after the first attempt, made of wood, started to collapse in 1965 and the second attempt, made of iron, was destroyed in Brisbane’s 1893 floods.  The third iteration was completed in 1897 but was later demolished to make way for a bigger bridge that could handle greater volumes of traffic. The current bridge opened in 1969 and is still in service today.